Body Weight

"Weight that is higher than what is considered as a healthy weight for a given height is described as overweight or obese. Body Mass Index, or BMI, is used as a screening tool for overweight or obesity. BMI is a person's weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. A high BMI can be an indicator of high body fatness. To calculate BMI, see the Adult BMI Calculator or determine BMI by finding your height and weight in this BMI Index Chart:

  • If your BMI is less than 18.5, it falls within the underweight range.

  • If your BMI is 18.5 to <25, it falls within the normal.

  • If your BMI is 25.0 to <30, it falls within the overweight range.

  • If your BMI is 30.0 or higher, it falls within the obese range.


Obesity is frequently subdivided into categories:

  • Class 1: BMI of 30 to < 35

  • Class 2: BMI of 35 to < 40

  • Class 3: BMI of 40 or higher. Class 3 obesity is sometimes categorized as “extreme” or “severe” obesity."

~from the CDC

Critiques of Body Mass Index

 

"Top 10 Reasons Why The BMI Is Bogus"

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=106268439 

"Why Body Mass Index Is Wrong for So Many People"

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-belk/body-mass-index_b_7693450.html

"Why BMI Is Inaccurate and Misleading"

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265215.php

Maine Resources​

Programs of the Maine Cardiovascular Health Council:
http://www.mainecardiohealth.org/programs/projects.htm

A joint project of the Maine Cardiovascular Health Council and Medical Care Development, Inc. This is statewide effort in cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention at the local level.

Bariatric Resources in Maine:
http://www.obesityhelp.com/morbidobesity/stateinfo.phtml?State=ME

A list of Maine surgeons, insurers, and other useful information about bariatric surgery.

National Resources​

National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance (NAAFA): http://www.naafa.org/
NAAFA is a non-profit human rights organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for fat people. NAAFA has been working since 1969 to eliminate discrimination based on body size and provide fat people with the tools for self-empowerment through public education, advocacy, and member support.

Discussions on Fat Acceptance: http://www.bodypositive.com/argument.htm
As you try to approach weight issues in a new way, you may find yourself fielding questions about how you can be trying to just accept your body size rather than lose weight.​

 

The National Organization for Lesbians Of Size: http://www.nolose.org/
A support, social and networking group for women who identify themselves as lesbians, and who are fat, or fat positive.

Hopkins Technology Exercise Recommendations: http://www.hoptechno.com/book11.htm
Many of the links in this guide will have information regarding exercise. The following link details the complexity of a fitness program. This is a recommendation to a plan and routine maintenance efforts in exercising. Always consult your doctor before attempting any program for exercising.

National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance (NAAFA):
http://www.naafa.org/info/legal/court.html

Founded in 1969, the National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance is a non-profit human rights organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for fat people. NAAFA works to eliminate discrimination based on body size and provide fat people with the tools for self-empowerment through public education, advocacy, and member support.

Obesity Perspectives and Statistics in the U.S.: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/obesity.html
National statistics and a wealth of additional information on obesity.

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion:
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/

More statistics and useful information of obesity.

Health Overview by Dr. Mills: http://www.umaine.edu/mcsc/MPR/Vol9No1/mills.htm
Dr. Dora A. Mills is Maine's Chief Medical Director who heads the Bureau of Health.

​​

Weight-control Information Network (WIN): http://win.niddk.nih.gov/
The Weight-control Information Network (WIN) is a national information service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

Shape Up America!: http://www.shapeup.org/
This website is designed to provide you with the latest information about safe weight management, healthy eating, increased activity and physical fitness.

Nutrition.Gov: http://www.nutrition.gov/
A new federal resource, providing easy access to all online federal government information on nutrition.

Links On Weight Loss & More: http://www.ensureyoursuccess.net/
A long list of links on weight loss and more.​

KidSource Online: http://www.kidsource.com/kidsource/content2/obesity.html
Many topics on cause and effect, diet and exercise, and much more.

WholeFitness.Com: http://www.wholefitness.com/kidsfitness.html
Do your children spend more time inside the house watching television or playing computer games than they spend playing outside?


BodyPositive.Com: http://www.bodypositive.com/childwt.htm#Teasing%20and%20Bullying
Issues children have when dealing with their weight and peer acceptance.

The Surgeon General's Call to Action:
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_consequences.htm

The American Society of Bariatric Physicians: http://www.asbp.org/

Florida State University College of Medicine:
http://medlib.med.utah.edu/WebPath/TUTORIAL/OBESITY/OBESITY.html

InteliHeatlh: 
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8596/24733/192512.html?d=dmtContent

 

Medical College of Wisconsin: http://healthlink.mcw.edu/article/984434798.html

 

The Johns Hopkins Arthritis Website:
http://www.hopkins-arthritis.som.jhmi.edu/mngmnt/osteoandweight.html

Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder with symptoms in the hands, knees, hips, back, and neck. It is unclear exactly how excess weight influences OA. Clearly, being overweight increases the load placed on the joints such as the knee, which increases stress and could possibly hasten the breakdown of cartilage.​

American Heart Association: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3053

Cardiac arrest strikes immediately and without warning. If it occurs, call 9-1-1 and begin CPR immediately. The signs of stroke are sudden loss of responsiveness, no response to gentle shaking, no normal breathing, no signs of circulation, and no movement or coughing.

Programs of the Maine Cardiovascular Health Council:
http://www.mainecardiohealth.org/programs/projects.htm

A joint project of the Maine Cardiovascular Health Council and Medical Care Development, Inc. This is statewide effort in cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention at the local level.

HeartCenter Online: 
http://www.heartcenteronline.com/myheartdr/common/articles.cfm?ARTID=416

An overview of the effects of obesity on the body. A comprehensive site for heart and health facts.

 

The American Society of Bariatric Physicians: http://www.asbp.org/
"The study found that men, 45 to 54 years of age who are not obese, faced a 35 percent chance of developing coronary heart disease during their lifetimes; risks increased to 38 percent for those who were mildly obese, 42 percent for those who were moderately obese, and 46 percent for those who were severely obese. Risks increased from 25 percent for the women who are not obese, to 29 percent, 32 percent, and 37 percent, depending the level of obesity."

The American Sleep Apnea Association: http://www.sleepapnea.org/
The Greek word "apnea" literally means "without breath." There are three types of sleep apnea: obstructive, central, and mixed; of the three, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common. Despite the difference in the root cause of each type, in all three, people with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times during the night and often for a minute or longer.

IntelliHealth: 
http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/8596/24733/192512.html?d=dmtContent

Weight is an American obsession. Ironically, the more Americans struggle to be thin, the more overweight we are. Approximately one-third of the American population is obese, meaning that they weigh more than 20 percent above the ideal weight for their height. The number of overweight Americans has risen steadily during the past decade, including the number of seriously obese adults and overweight children.

Bariatric Resources in Maine:
http://www.obesityhelp.com/morbidobesity/stateinfo.phtml?State=ME

A list of Maine surgeons, insurers, and other useful information about bariatric surgery.
 

Bariatric Surgery Support: http://www.obesityhelp.com/morbidobesity/index.phtml

Uniquely Me- Plus Sizes for Women: http://www.uniquelyme.com/

King Size Direct- Clothes for Big Men: http://www.kingsizedirect.com/

List of Suppliers of Chairs, Beds, and Other Topics: http://www.drumlib.com/lk/obesity.htm

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